25th APS Annual Convention: Mark Your Calendar (Washington, DC, USA - May 23-26, 2013)

PSPI Symposium

Psychological Science in the Public Interest

Friday, May 24, 2013, 4:00 PM - 5:50 PM
Delaware Suite A

Elaine F. Walker Chair: Elaine F. Walker
Emory University

The engaging reports in each issue of the APS journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI) offer definitive and often provocative assessments by panels of distinguished scientists of what psychological science tells us about issues of broad public concern. This special symposium features the authors of two recent PSPI reports.


Read the full PSPI reports: Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology and Misinformation and Its Correction: Continued Influence and Successful Debiasing

 

Elizabeth J. Marsh

Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques: Promising Directions From Cognitive and Educational Psychology
Elizabeth J. Marsh
Duke University
Improving educational outcomes requires efforts on many fronts, but part of the solution should involve student adoption of easy-to-use learning techniques known to promote retention and understanding. We evaluate the relative utility of common techniques, recommending practice testing but not highlighting, for example. Directions for future research will be discussed.


Stephan Lewandowsky

Misinformation and Its Correction: Continued Influence and Successful Debiasing
Stephan Lewandowsky
University of Bristol, United Kingdom, and University of Western Australia
The widespread prevalence and persistence of misinformation in contemporary societies, such as the false belief that there is a link between childhood vaccinations and autism, is a matter of public concern. I first examine the mechanisms by which such misinformation is disseminated in society, both inadvertently and purposely. I then review the cognitive factors that often render misinformation resistant to correction and I show why efforts to retract misinformation can even backfire and, ironically, increase misbelief. Notwithstanding those difficulties, the debunking of misinformation is possible and I provide some recommendations about how corrections should be designed, structured, and applied in order to maximize their impact.

Read the APS Daily Observations on Stephan Lewandowsky: Part I and Part II.


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