Study shows teens imitate risky sex of films, TV

The Washington Times:

Can you name the last five movies your teenage son or daughter has watched with friends? How strong was the sexual content in those movies? Does it really matter?

New research suggests it does. The study, conducted by Ross O’Hara and soon to be published in the journal Psychological Science, found that on-screen promiscuity promotes promiscuity in real life.

“Adolescents who are exposed to more sexual content in movies start having sex at younger ages, have more sexual partners” and engage in riskier sexual activities, Mr. O’Hara said.

While at Dartmouth University, Mr. O’Hara (now a researcher at the University of Missouri) and his team analyzed the movie-watching patterns of about 1,200 young teens, ages 12 to 14. Researchers analyzed the teens’ sexual behavior six years later, considering the age at which they became sexually active, their number of partners and the riskiness of their sexual activity, including whether they used contraceptives.

Read the whole story: The Washington Times

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